by Cathey Stamps, Best Year Yet® Partner

One question I get asked a lot is how to set the right goals. People worry that they aren’t being realistic when they let themselves dream or that they might be setting goals that are way too big to achieve – all of which begs the question, “What dreams are too big to be realistic?”

As with most things, the answer to this question comes down to how important your dream is to you. The bigger the dream, the more dedication it may take. Does that keep you from setting big goals or inspire you to find a way to get the results you want?

by Kris Gleason, Best Year Yet® Partner

Lately, I’ve been distracted by my rear view mirror. I can’t get into my car any more without glancing at it and recalling a passage I recently read in a book called Miracle Morning by Hal Erod. In it, Hal says one of the most crippling causes of mediocrity in life is a condition he calls Rear view Mirror Syndrome (RMS ).

Our subconscious minds are equipped with a self-limiting rear view mirror, through which we continuously relive and recreate our past. We mistakenly believe that who we were is who we are, thus limiting our true potential in the present, based on the limitations of our past.

by Lisa Kelly, Best Year Yet® Partner

In the movie The Blindside there is a scene in which Sandra Bullock’s character, Leigh Anne Tuohy, an upper class, white, mother of two, is trying to build a relationship with Michael Oher, an oversized inner city African American teenager (played by Quinton Aaron).  After hitting brick wall after brick wall, she turns to him and says, “Tell me one thing, just one thing, I ought to know about you.” And thus the relationship begins.

by Cathey Stamps, Best Year Yet® Partner and VP of Marketing & Communications

My partner has a saying that helps me keep myself from getting caught up in the stress, drama and weighty-ness of work situations – “We’re not saving lives here.” It’s a great reminder that I don’t need to put too much stress on myself over the little things. Since I have stepped into my role at Best Year Yet®, I have a different perspective on that saying.

by Diana Baysinger,  Best Year Yet® Partner and Trainer

Those of us who have created our Best Year Yet® plans are familiar with the phrase The Moment of Change. This moment happens after Question 4 of our 10-question process that leads to the one-page plan for the year.  When we identify our most limiting belief about ourselves and release the energy that has held us back from reaching our true potential, we experience a moment of change.